22 July, 2012

Cutting Out Party


Cutting Out Party miniature wargame rules written by Mr. Henry (Hank) Lubbers.
 
CUTTING OUT PARTY
By Henry Lubbers

The Objective of the game is to successfully cut out a naval vessel from the safety of its home port and put out to sea as a prize of the navy.

The game may be played as a team vs. an umpire or with both sides being represented by opposing players.

The table layout is very simple, a harbor setting with one or more shore batteries covering the ship. The action will normally occur at night. Each player would normally command a boat or section of boats with marines and sailors, with the mission of cutting out the vessel.

TURN SEQUENCE
Some steps in the sequence might be skipped.
1.      All boats move and land forces and shipboard forces move
2.      Ship’s challenge
3.      Defender rolls a die to spot OR gives alarm, OR responds to alarm or firing
4.      Raiding party fires
5.      Defenders fire
6.      Melee of all forces in base to base contact OR attempting to board either ship or shore battery
7.      Rigging rolls are made
8.      Morale is checked

MOVEMENT
·         Boats move 6” PLUS d6 roll (each boat makes a separate die roll)
·         Boats slow down by moving half of their previous turn movement until stopping
·         Ships that are ½ rigged go 6” PLUS a d6 roll
·         Ships that are fully rigged move 12” PLUS a d10 roll
·         On land figures move 6” PLUS a d6 roll
·         Marines and soldiers traveling as formed for volley fire travel 3” PLUS a d6 roll
·         Figures boarding a hostile vessel roll a d6. A roll of 1 or 2 indicates the boarders were unsuccessful (not enough movement points to climb the side of the ship and jump over the rail). A roll of 3-6 indicates the boarders were successful in reaching the deck. Boarding player then rolls d6 and may move the number of boarders onto the deck, equal to the number of pips face-up on the die.  
·         Figures landing on a mole or pier use the same rules as for boarding a vessel.
·         Figures landing on a beach move d6 during that turn
·         Crew figures on board their own ship or figures that have successfully boarded a ship can move up to 6” per turn

DEFENDER ATTEMPTS TO SPOT
Raiding parties might be spotted in their approach according to the following chart;
Nearest boat is:
0-6” away
6.1” – 12.0”
12.1” – 24”
Spotted on a d6 roll of:*
4-6
5-6
6
*THIS ROLL IS MADE ONLY ONCE PER TURN
If the raiding party is spotted:
·         The NEXT turn the alarm is sounded.
·         The turn after the alarm is sounded the defenders may respond, i.e. the ship’s crew may begin to turn out, shore battery crews may run to their guns, etc., etc.
·         The turn after the crew and garrison turns out they may fire.
The defending crew will come boiling out of the main hatch at a rate of one figure for each pip on a d6 roll per turn until the hatch is secured by the boarding party.
EXAMPLE- On turn one the boats are spotted. On turn two the alarm is given. On turn three the defenders come out. On board the defending ship four figures come out of the hatch on a d6 roll of 4. The next turn (turn four), the defenders may fire. Three more defenders come out of the hatch on a d6 roll of 3.
  • If the attack is made in daytime add +2 to the spotting die roll AND the alarm sequence begins when the raiders are spotted without a turn delay.
  • If the raiders should fire BEFORE they are spotted the alarm is automatically given that turn.

During movement the raiders’ boats must make physical contact with the target vessel. The turn AFTER contact is made the boarding party may attempt to climb on board.
SHIP’S CHALLENGE
If raiders have been spotted skip this phase.
If the raiding party is undetected and along side the target ship, the target’s guard will issue a challenge. On a d6 roll of 3 or less the raiding officer is able to disguise his voice and fool the guard long enough for the raiders to gain the main deck (assuming they did not roll a 1 or 2 for movement). On a roll of 4 or more the guard will sound the alarm THIS turn and every boat’s crew that is opposed by a guard will have to overcome that guard during the melee phase.
PLEASE NOTE that the raiding party may attempt to shoot the guard (requires a die roll of 6) but the act of shooting automatically sounds the alarm.
MELEE
Melee is conducted when figures are in base to base contact at the time of the melee phase OR the raiding party has to force its way onto the target ship or capture a shore battery.
Each figure rolls a d6.
If the winner gets a +3 difference over the loser (a 4 vs. a 1 for example) the loser dies.
If the die roll difference is +2 the loser is captured.
If the difference is a +1 the loser retreats the number of inches equal to a d6 roll.
If the loser is forced to retreat off the ship he is out of the game.
If the loser is trying to board a ship the figure is considered to be dead no matter what the difference is.
Modifiers to the melee die roll.
+1 to defender if the raiders are trying to climb up the ship and board
+1 defending a shore battery
+1 guarding the hatch against ship’s crew trying to gain the main deck
+ 1 a marine in melee
+ 1 British vs. anyone but American
+ 1 American vs. anyone but British
FIRING
Small Arms Fire – a hit is a kill
Each musket armed figure may fire small arms by rolling a d6
-2 from the die if the target is behind earthworks or in a fort
+1 if at least 6 marines/soldiers are lined up stand to stand in one or two ranks (this is done to reflect volley fire)

Small Arms Chart

Range
1”
2-5”
6”
British/American sailors
To hit roll
4-6
5-6
n/a
British/American marines or soldiers
To hit roll
3-6
4-6
6
French sailors
To hit roll
5-6
6
n/a
French marines or soldiers
To hit roll
4-6
5-6
n/a
Other sailors
To hit roll
6
6
n/a
Other marines or soldiers
To hit roll
5-6
6
n/a

Cannon Fire
Each crewed gun may fire. There are four figures to a gun crew. Roll 2d6, a red one for hit determination and a white one for effect determination. If firing grape shot substitute d10 for the white d6 on effect determination.
Modifiers to cannon fire.
-1 each gun crewman killed
-1 firing at raiders’ boats
-1 foggy or moonless night
+1 bright  moon light
+2 daytime
Guns may choose to fire grapeshot at a target. The decision to fire grapeshot must be made before firing (roll d10 or a d6 as directions indicate, each pip or ½ pips, rounding down, removes a figure). Swivel guns MUST fire grape against figures.
Cannon Firing Chart
Cannon type
Range
6”

6”-12”

12-24”
24-36”
36-48”
48-60”



Grape roll

Grape roll




Ship’s guns
to hit roll
2-6
1d10
3-6
½ d10
4-6
5-6
6
n/a
Land based guns
to hit roll
2-6
1d10
2-6
1d10
3-6
4-6
5-6
6
Swivel guns
to hit roll
3-6
1d6
5-6
½ d6
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a

EXAMPLE. A ship’s gunner chooses to fire grape at a target 7” away. A roll of 3-6 is needed to score a hit. A 5 is rolled. Now a d10 is rolled to determine how many figures become casualties. Since the chart call for ½ d10 the number rolled on the d10 is halved, rounding down. A 5 is rolled so two figures become casualties. A land based gun firing grape at the same distance would require a die roll between 2-6. The land based gun would roll a whole d10 for effect.

Once a hit has been determined on the above chart, it will be necessary to consult the chart below for the effects of the shot to be determined (unless grapeshot was fired).





Cannonball Hit Determination Chart
Die Roll
Target is
Land Fort
Anchored Ship
Moving Ship
Ship’s Boats
1

Figure Killed
Hull hit
Hull hit
Hull hit
2

Figure Killed
Hull hit
Hull hit
Hull hit
3

Figure Killed
Rigging hit roll a d10
Hull hit
Hull hit
4

Gun silenced 1 turn
Rigging hit roll a d10
Rigging hit roll a d6
Hull hit
5

Gun silenced 1 turn
Gun silenced for game
Rigging hit roll a d6
Crew hit
roll a d6
6

Gun and crew destroyed
Gun silenced for game
Gun silenced for game
Crew hit
Roll a d10

A rigging d6 or d10 means that the result of such a die roll is deducted from the raiding party’s attempt to rig the ship and sail away. (SEE RIGGING).

Hull hits for each vessel need to be determined by mutual consent or by an umpire BEFORE the game begins.
When ½ of the hull points needed to sink a vessel are accumulated, the vessel will then go ½ speed (rounding down) for the rest of the game. Obviously when all hull points have been taken the vessel sinks.
RIGGING
To rig a ship for escape from the harbor a die roll is made each turn AFTER the ship has been secured by the raiding party.
A ship is considered to be HALF RIGGED with an accumulative score of 20
A ship is considered to be FULLY RIGGED with an accumulative score of 40
The raiding party may roll a d10 rigging roll each turn that the top deck has been swept clean of active enemy forces AND the main hatch is under guard.
The raiding party may only roll a d6 if there are active defenders on the main deck OR the main hatch is not under guard OR the ship was HIT by cannon fire this turn. If the cannon fire resulted in a rigging hit, the firing unit rolls a d6 or a d10 as instructed and DEDUCTS the score from the raiding party’s total accumulated points.
EXAMPLE. With the ship still not secure but with raiders on the deck, the raiders roll a d6 and get a 3. They now need 17 more points to be ½ rigged. Next turn the ship and hatch are secured and the ship has not been hit by cannon fire. The raiders roll a d10 and get a 7. They now need 10 more points to be ½ rigged. The very next turn the ship and hatch are secured and the ship has not been hit by cannon fire. The raiders roll a d10 and get a 7. They now need 10 more points to be ½ rigged. The very next turn the shore battery opens up on the ship and scores two hits. The raiders roll a d6 because the cannon hits and gets a 4. The ship’s total is now 14. The battery rolled a 2 and a 4 for effects. The ship receives a hull hit for the 2 and now rolls a d10 for the 4 (anchored target) with a result of 5 for rigging hits. The 5 is subtracted from the 14. The ship has an accumulated rigging total of 9.
MORALE
Ship’s Crew
Once the deck has been swept of defenders and the main hatch is held by the raiders for a turn (i.e. any attempt to break out of the hatch has been defeated or no attempt was made the turn after the deck was swept) the ship’s crew becomes docile. If friends board the ship to retake it, the crew may again join the game and attempt to break out of the hatch. If the raiders abandon the ship , the crew may regain the upper deck. Defending crew are allowed only one turn after the deck is swept to break out from the hatch.

Boat’s Crew and land garrisons
When a boat’s crew or garrison is reduced to ½ or less of their original numbers they will test morale every turn with a d6.
1-2 surrender if enemy is within 6” or retreat off ship or out of fort
3-4 next turn fallback away from enemy or reenter boats until rallied (requires a 5-6 on next morale check)
5-6 rallies or carries on as normal
Modifiers
British vs. French                     +1 for British
Americans vs. pirates               +1 for Americans
Charismatic leader                    +1

SAMPLE GAME
The raiders approach in turn 1 and turn 2 outside of detection range. On a turn 3 the nearest boat approaches to within 15” of the target ship. After movement the defender rolls a d6 to spot. The defender rolls a 5. At 15” a 6 is needed. On turn 4 after movement the nearest boat is 9” away. Again the defender rolls a d6 and this time gets a 4. Again the roll is inadequate to spot. On turn 5 the nearest ship’s boat approaches to 3”. The defender rolls and this time the boats are spotted.
On turn 6 the boats’ movement carries them to the ship’s side. The defender sounds the alarm.
On turn 7, the real fun begins. The defender rolls a d6 to see how many crew come up on the deck to help the ship’s guard (remember ship’s crew can move 6”). The raiders roll a d6 to see if they can climb on board. (Remember, this is done with a -1 so that a roll of 1 or 2 will not allow boarders enough distance to climb up.) Some raiders do not make the climb. Other raiders must suspend their climb to fight the opposing ship’s guard and crew. Since the alarm has been given there is no harm in the raiders firing their weapons at the guards. A roll of 6 kills a guard. Melees are then fought. Let us assume that the raiders, with overwhelming numbers, overpowered the guards and the few crew that climbed out of the hatch.
Turn 8 and the deck has been swept of defenders and a marine guard placed on the main hatch. The defender’s shore battery now can open fire. No hits are scored. The marine guard placed on the main hatch. The defender’s shore battery now can open fire. No hits are scored. The marine guard gets a +2 defending the hatch (+1 for defending, + 1 for a marine in melee) so the enemy crew (only 2, 2 on a d6) do not break out. The raiders roll a d6 to start rigging the ship.
On turn 9 the ship is secured. Again the shore battery misses with their guns. Therefore the raiders can roll a d10 for rigging.
Play continues until the ship has put to out to sea or is sunk or recaptured. The garrison may try to send out boats to try to retake the ship. Really, anything could happen.
GENERAL NOTES
The rules are intended for use with 15mm figures. Using larger figures will naturally mean adjustments in movement and ranges.
This is a great beer and pretzels game. Our group ran 10 games in about two hours. Each game was different. Most of the games were very bloody.
Although the ship board fighting can take place on model ships (especially if the rigging is removable) it is sometimes easier to conduct the boarding, deck melees and fighting on a cardboard cut-out of the deck. The cut-out has two advantages: 1, it is easier to reach if the cutout is near the edge of the table rather than the model which might be in the middle of the table, and 2, it is easier to manipulate the figures on an uncluttered cut-out.
The game is a good solo game. It is very easy to spice up a solo game with random events cards. These cards should be your own invention based on a general possibility or a scenario specific event. I would suggest putting a random events card draw at the beginning of the turn. Many of the cards should be NO EVENT HAPPENS cards.


Card Events Ideas
  1. The moon comes out from behind the clouds this turn. Spotting is a +1 as is firing.
  2. Choppy seas renders boarding party’s muskets inoperative for X turns.
  3. Ensign gets confused in the dark. One ship’s boat will make a random movement based on a die roll for direction.
  4. Ship’s guard is asleep. There will be no spotting check from on board ship this turn.
  5. Garrison will take one extra turn to respond when alarm is given due to raucous party earlier that evening.

Well, you get the idea. Any questions or comments? Contact me at hgl1@ix.netcom.com or Henry G. Lubbers, 2519 Hazelcrest Ln., Cincinnati, Ohio 45231. Hey, on the E-mail I have two teenagers so my computer access is limited – be patient.




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